A journey to the past – The Philippine National Museum

It’s been years already since my last visit to the National Museum and If I can still recall, I’m on 4th grade when we entered it’s door.

My most vivid memory during that trip was when I saw the “Spoliarium” for the very first time.

Over the weekend, I have decided to once again relive that moment and embark on a journey to the past…

This is the annex building of the national museum where all archeological artifacts could be found.
The Senate Session Hall of the National Art Galley.
“Diwata” by Guillermo Tolentino
The “Spoliarium” is the most valuable oil-on-canvas painting by Juan Luna, a Filipino educated at the Academia de Dibujo y Pintura (Philippines) and at the Academia de San Fernando in Madrid, Spain. With a size of 4.22 meters x 7.675 meters, it is the largest painting in the Philippines
El Asesinato del Gobernador Bustamante by Félix Resurrección Hidalgo
Works of a Filipino sculptor Isabelo Tampinco, known for his woodcarvings for churches, most notably the Church of San Ignacio in Intramuros: altar, the pillars, the ceilings and the other intricate portions of the church; public edifices; and homes.
Continuing the theme and late 19th century period of the previous gallery, works by Félix Resurrección Hidalgo are featured together with sculptures by IsabeloTampinco (Key works of which are the Gift of Ernesto and Araceli Salas).
Continuing the theme and late 19th century period of the previous gallery, works by Félix Resurrección Hidalgo are featured together with sculptures by IsabeloTampinco (Key works of which are the Gift of Ernesto and Araceli Salas).
Philippine art of the academic and romantic period, specifically of the last three decades of the 19th century, featuring especially the Museum’s considerable holdings of the work of Juan Luna and key contemporaries. Highlights include works by Lorenzo Guerrero, Gaston O’Farrell, and National Cultural Treasures such as Feeding the Chickens, one the earliest known Philippine genre paintings, by Simon Flores, as well as the famous UnaBulaqueñaby Juan Luna. Featured also are nearly 100 works by Luna that formed part of the historic donation of the GraceLuna de San Pedro Collection by the Far East Bankand Trust Company in the early 1990s.
Colonial Philippine religious art from the 17th to the 19th centuries, prominent among which is aretablo from the Church of San Nicolás de Tolentino in Dimiao, Bohol – a NationalCultural Treasure – together with a selection of carved religious images (santos), reliefs and polychromes.
“Mother’s Revenge” by Jose Rizal
Works of Vicente Silva Manansala
Art collections
Art collections
Artifacts collection
Traditional clothes collection
Artifacts collection
Artifacts
Artifacts collection
View from the third floor
Facade of the National Art Gallery

I even enjoyed it the second time around! 🙂

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12 thoughts on “A journey to the past – The Philippine National Museum”

    1. Thank you Shane! 🙂

      Yes, it is really beautiful, it was built in 1901 and parts of it were damaged during World War 2. It was reconstructed to preserve and restore it’s original structure.

      Like

    1. Hi melissajane14. Thank you for your message. 🙂

      I’m happy to know that you would like to go back here. You must have had a wonderful experience back then.

      Have fun & keep safe on your travels. 🙂

      Like

    1. Hi! Thank you for stopping by. The Philippine National Museum is located at the heart of Manila near Luneta and Manila City Hall.

      The museum is open daily from 9 AM – 5 PM.

      Hope this helps. Have fun! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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